ValveWorks® Help


  1. Getting Started
  2. Sizing a Valve (for size and selection verification or to integrate with a project/quote)
  3. Configuring a Valve (for realizing legal combinations, pricing checks and quotes)
  4. Initiating a Project (desired when multiple valves are to be selected and part of a quote package)
  5. Customers
  6. Initiating Sizing, Flow Characteristic and Quotation Reports
  7. Requesting a Quote (will contact the authorized rep / distributor in your area to initiate a quote)
  8. Valve Info (web links to various valve product specifications)
  9. Load Sizing Calculations
  10. Pressure Drop Calculator


Getting Started

FIRST complete registration by selecting the ‘New User’ link from the main ValveWorks® Login Page.

Go to the main menu item for ‘My Profile’. Select ‘Edit’ and complete the entries for Contact Information and Address as it will get used on various report forms.

At the bottom of this page, press the button for ‘Pricing Access’ if you are a Warren Controls authorized rep or distributor. (This will be verified and set up by the administrator within 48 hours of the request.)

This will allow you to see pricing in ValveWorks and display pricing on quotes.

When done here, press ‘Save’ up at the top of the page.

If you are a Warren Controls representative or distributor the last thing to do is to go into the ‘Customer’ tab and enter in some of your more common and popular customers just to get things started for quoting projects.

Sizing a Valve

<This Tab is under construction and not yet functional. To size a valve, go to the Project Tab>

Configuring a Valve

<This Tab is under construction and not yet functional.>

Initiating a Project

The Project Tab is where you will initiate a project to size and select valves with the final goal being various project reports as either printed or saved PDF files. If you have not yet filled in customer information for the given project, do this first via the Customers tab. Otherwise, begin by clicking the New Project button. From here, enter a unique and relevant project name. The description is optional. The Customer field will link back the customer contacts you had previously set up. Quote Notes is something you may choose to go back and add at the end prior to initiating a quote report. These may be commercial considerations. Quote validity is customarily set to 90 days but it is good to check with the factory when approaching the end of a calendar year. Delivery is also a projection that you will need to obtain directly from Warren Controls inside sales to add to this field once complete and prior to issuing a quote report. When finished, click Next (all these fields can be edited later).

Successively you must complete all tabs: Fluid Units – Input Filters – Sizing Data – Valve Body – Actuators – Accessories. Once complete, click on the Save/Return button and that will save this valve into this project. Again, editing can be done at any time.

Customers

This tab is where you set up your customer contacts. Once this is populated the process of generating reports becomes much more efficient. Begin by clicking the New Customer button and enter as much information as you can. This information is saved for only your profile.

Initiating Sizing, Flow Characteristic and Quotation Reports

Initiating various reports is one the most useful features of ValveWorks®. In the appropriate section, click on the button for the report of interest and you will be directed to print or save as a PDF file.

Requesting a Quote

At any time while in the Projects Tab of ValveWorks® you can click the Request a Quote button. Based on your profile information ValveWorks will direct you to request the Representative in your area. Within one to two business days you will receive your quote via the email in your profile from a local Warren Controls distributor near you.

Valve Info

This is a series of online links to our most up-to-date Control Valve Product Specifications and IOM’s. This can be handy to open and review while engaged in a sizing exercise to better verify product range, construction and various performance criteria. It may also be useful to save in the popular PDF format for redistribution with a quote or sizing report.

Load Sizing Calculations

These load calculations are provided for the use of estimating demand in popular heating and cooling applications using saturated steam or water as the heating or cooling medium. They are proven and time honored calculations that provide reasonable flow estimates for when required flows within the valve sizing table are otherwise unknown. Following is a brief description of each.

Heating or Cooling Water with Water (Heat Balance Method)

This method of calculating water heating or cooling requirements from the process demand is based on ‘Heat Balance’. For instance, water being heated is picking up heat from the water that is the heat source and the amount of heat that is gained by the heated water must be given up by the heating water. This process is simply reversed by a cooling application.

The information needed for this calculation is a follows:

  1. The flow rate of the water to be heated or cooled in GPM
  2. The desired temperature rise or drop (ΔT) of the water to be heated or cooled
  3. The allowable temperature rise or drop in the heating or cooling water. This value may be a “don’t care” condition but must be provided. The higher this temperature differential, the smaller the valve is that will be required.
Heating or Cooling Water with Water (BTU Method)

This method of calculating water heating or cooling requirements is derived from the BTU. In the English system the measure of heat is the British Thermal Unit or BTU. This unit of heat is simply the amount of heat required to raise one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit. Actually, there is a slight variation at different temperatures, but the variation is insignificant.

The information needed for this calculation is a follows:

  1. The BTU’s/Hr. to be added or removed of the heated or cooled water
  2. The allowable temperature rise or drop in the heating or cooling water. This value may be a “don’t care” condition but must be provided. The higher this temperature differential, the smaller the valve is that will be required.
Heating or Cooling Air with Water (as with finned radiators)

This method does not require knowing BTU’s and the formula is quite simple.

The information needed for this calculation is a follows:

  1. The flow rate of the air to be heated or cooled in SCFM
  2. The desired temperature rise or drop (ΔT) of the air to be heated or cooled
  3. The allowable temperature rise or drop in the heating or cooling water. This value may be a “don’t care” condition but must be provided. The higher this temperature differential, the smaller the valve is that will be required.
Heating Water with Steam (Latent Heat Method)

This method of calculating water heating requirements from the process demand is based on the Latent Heat of Steam. A steam table is provided to look up this Latent Heat of Steam value within the calculation dialog box. The reference point within this table is the steam pressure or temperature on the process side of the control valve.

The information needed for this calculation is a follows:

  1. The flow rate of the water to be heated in GPM
  2. The desired temperature rise (ΔT) of the water to be heated
  3. Knowledge of either the steam pressure or temperature within the process or heat exchanger
Heating Oil with Steam (simple method)

This method does not require knowing BTU’s and the formula is quite simple.

The information needed for this calculation is a follows:

  1. The flow rate of the oil to be heated in GPM
  2. The desired temperature rise (ΔT) of the oil to be heated
Heating Liquids with Steam (other than water)

This method of calculating liquid heating requirements from the process demand is based on the specific knowledge of certain constants of that liquid. This calculation cannot be performed without first having this reference information

The information needed for this calculation is a follows:

  1. The flow rate of the water to be heated in GPM
  2. The Specific Heat of the Liquid (Cp)
  3. The Weight of the Liquid (Lbs./Gallon)
  4. The desired temperature rise (ΔT) of the liquid to be heated
  5. Knowledge of either the steam pressure or temperature within the process or heat exchanger
Heating Liquids in Steam Jacketed Kettles

This method of calculating liquid heating requirements from the process demand is based on the specific knowledge of certain constants of that liquid. This calculation cannot be performed without first having this reference information

The information needed for this calculation is a follows:

  1. The total volume of the liquid in the kettle to be heated in Gallons
  2. The Specific Heat of the Liquid (Cp)
  3. The Specific Gravity of the Liquid (Gf)
  4. The desired temperature rise (ΔT) of the liquid to be heated
  5. The time in hours the for the temperature rise (ΔT) to take place
  6. Knowledge of either the steam pressure or temperature within the jacketed kettle
General Liquid Heating

This method of calculating liquid heating requirements from the process demand is based on the specific knowledge of certain constants of that liquid. This calculation cannot be performed without first having this reference information

The information needed for this calculation is a follows:

  1. The total liquid weight in Lbs.
  2. The Specific Heat of the Liquid (Cp)
  3. The desired temperature rise (ΔT) of the liquid to be heated
  4. The time in hours the for the temperature rise (ΔT) to take place
  5. Knowledge of either the steam pressure or temperature within the process or heat exchanger
Heating Air with Steam (simple method)

This method does not require knowing BTU’s and the formula is quite simple.

The information needed for this calculation is a follows:

  1. The flow rate of the air to be heated in SCFM
  2. The desired temperature rise (ΔT) of the air to be heated
Pressure Drop Calculator

This is a tool used for providing a ‘What-If’ analysis for when a flowing pressure drop on a valve is an unknown. Pressure Drop (or outlet pressure) is required to complete the valve sizing exercise. When it is realized that this is unknown, this tool can be deployed in a way to learn what might be a reasonable or acceptable pressure drop by performing a basic calculation with available process information. You will need a relevant product specification open to perform this as you will need to identify various Cv’s from valves. You must be editing a particular valve from within Project or Sizing to see the Pressure Drop Calculator link on the left side banner. Click this link and a dialog box will appear. Simply fill in all sections and press ‘Calculate’ as many times as you need to make iterations. When finished, click OK. This does not do anything other than close the dialog box.